Why Content Marketing’s Future Depends on Shorter Content and Less Content

Steve rayson’s latest buzzsumo article is provocative, interesting and well-written. But I do hope he’s wrong when he says the future will be about more content, not less. He shares why he thinks content marketing brands will begin producing more content in the days ahead, and how they’ll likely be successful by doing so.

Upon reading the piece, I did a facepalm. I was reminded of a conversation I had a few years back, when I walked into the break room of the agency I was working for, and almost bumped into the content specialist on my team.

After we exchanged pleasantries, she informed me of an unwise decision she was about to make.

Her: “Guess What? I’m Going to Run a Marathon”

Me: “Ok. How many marathons have you run? And have you been training for this one?”

Her: “I’ve never ran one, but there are a lot of training guides online; they say it only takes 17 weeks to train for it.”

The philosophy of doing a lot what we don’t yet do well is ruining content marketing — and the knees, joints and backs of wannabe marathoners.

If you doubt that, please explain why 90% of what’s published online barely rises to the level of crap.

Anyone who disagrees with that statement is either (a) fooling themselves or (b) never had to conduct a content audit.

Even for big brands, producing quality content Journalist Email List with frequency is seemingly near-impossible task

Therefore, when someone says “Create more content,” I hear “Brands will continue to waste resources that would be better spent elsewhere,” for now. Worse still, it means they’ll see the failure as not one of execution.

But Born of Content Marketing Itself

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Rayson is a solid content marketer working for a EL Leads brand with a strong product. I admire them both. And while I don’t mean to attack him, I would like to tackle the logic of the post, which I’ll excerpt below.

[eds. Note: the primary reason I chose to tackle this topic is because content frequency and content length remain two of the biggest albatrosses impacting our industry. Despite this fact, many fail to see how related they are. That is, many brands are failing fast by chasing the long-form posts and frequent posting unicorn. Also, I’m very clear in understanding that rayson is not advocating for quantity at the expense of quality. My contention is simply that quantity is typically the wrong goal, at least for the vast majority of brands.]

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